Waiting for additional research will make us 3rd to market, but I really think we need to test the font size

Analysis paralysis is a myth

Waiting for additional research will make us 3rd to market, but I really think we need to test the font size

Cries of ‘analysis paralysis’ are more often fiction than fact. Every time I’ve heard someone call out the phrase in a meeting it’s to end a argument over some particular solution preference rather than an attempt end to an overly long analysis process. The problem isn’t too much analysis, it’s too little. Surrounded by weak, muddy and conflicting information we often fail to find a clear call to action that we can easily latch onto and end up playing what if with the weak solutions that we can find, unable to commit to one. We need to take a more structured approach to traveling from problem to solution – scan, focus and then act – and apply our judgement rather than trying to skip directly to the end of the book and then arguing about the conclusion.

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The Enterprise of Tomorrow

David Glideh gave a talk at Unsexy Startups in London on the future of the enterprise, building on an using some of the key themes in the book. The video is embedded below.

Cloud, globalisation and social tools are changing the way Enterprises operate. Enterprises are going to be revolutionised and look extremely different in the future. How that looks will drive the success of new start-ups in the Enterprise space.

David Gildeh was Founder/CEO of SambaStream, an online collaboration tool for SMEs, which was acquired by Alfresco in 2011, the worlds leading open-source Enterprise Content Management system, where he currently leads their new Cloud business.

We are all expectation machines

Christmas presents

Unlearning is potentially more important than learning{{1}} as it allows us to sweep away concepts and preferences that are now longer relevant, clearing the way for us to learn something new which doesn’t sit well with what we previously knew. But why is unlearning so hard? It’s because we’re trained from birth to favour ideas and experiences that align with our expectations, and abhor those that clash with them. The real challenge is to manage our expectations, as we’re all expectation machines.

[[1]]Unlearning is the most important thing @ PEG[[1]]

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Unlearning is the most important thing

After class

We’ve all become obsessed with learning over the last few years. The world is changing quite rapidly and we need to constantly learn new tricks if we want to keep up with the market we work in. Learning the new-new thing is often seen as the key to success. This attitude has it all backwards; it’s not learning that is the challenge, it’s our ability to unlearn that’s holding many of us back.

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Governance isn’t a process

For some strange reason every time someone mentions ‘governance’ all sense is thrown out the window, the process wonks rub their hands with glee, and you soon find yourself waist deep in treacle like processes that slow everything down to the point that it’s impossible to get anything done.

Governance isn’t a process, and adding more processes won’t necessarily improve your governance.

Governance is a question of decision rights:

  • who gets to make the decision
  • what information should be considered when making the decision
  • who can influence the decision
  • who needs to be informed of the decision

‘Process’ is just a tool we use to manage the decision making journey.

Observe, Orient, Decide, Act

OODA: Observe, Orient, Decide, Act
OODA: Observe, Orient, Decide, Act

It seems that I’ve shared this with four or five different groups of people over the last couple of weeks, so I thought it worthwhile putting it on the blog. Plus this is one of those instances where the Wikipedia page is not the best launching point.

Anyway, OODA (Observe, Orient, Decide, Act){{1}}, shown above, is a learning framework created by John Boyd{{2}}.

[[1]]John Boyd, The OODA LOOP, The Essence of Winning and Losing, slide 4 @ danford.net[[1]]

[[2]]A John Boyd Biography @ danford.net[[2]]

Colonel Boyd was an interesting bloke who had a huge influence on military tactics. One of his key insights was that success in a rapidly changing environment depends on your ability to adapt to the environment as it changes about you. The successful army is the one that can adapt as the world changes around it, and not necessarily the army with more resources at its disposal. This is interesting as the evidence is in and it shows that – for the vast majority of businesses – your competitors have very little influence on your success or failure; the largest factor is your ability to adapt and stay relevant as the market changes around you. Think Nokia, RIM and the iPhone. Or think in terms of high speed rail and point-to-point buses vs. discount air travel in Europe. The complication here is that today’s environment is changing so rapidly that your art – your product – might only have a shelf life of six months or so.

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Three questions you need to ask

There's three questions you need to ask yourself before you invest a large chunk of cash in some enterprise application:

  • Can I use something, rather than configuring something, rather than customising something?
  • How will the solution support the (social) community who will use it?
  • Is there a reason why I can't buy the solution ‘on-demand’ via SaaS?

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Technological Considerations of AML/CTF Programs

I had the chance in the last couple of months to review the (very old) chapter Technological Considerations of AML/CTF Programs chapter the I wrote with a couple of colleagues for LexisNexis’s Anti-Money Laundering and Financial Crime publication. The world has changed quite a bit since then so it was more like a recreation than a simple revision.

LexisNexis have kindly made an extract available, which you can find below via a Scribd embed. If you’re interested then head over to LexisNexis (or I suppose we can catch up for a coffee or something).