Tag Archives: Economics

Technological Considerations of AML/CTF Programs

I had the chance in the last couple of months to review the (very old) chapter Technological Considerations of AML/CTF Programs chapter the I wrote with a couple of colleagues for LexisNexis’s Anti-Money Laundering and Financial Crime publication. The world has changed quite a bit since then so it was more like a recreation than a simple revision.

LexisNexis have kindly made an extract available, which you can find below via a Scribd embed. If you’re interested then head over to LexisNexis (or I suppose we can catch up for a coffee or something).

Innovation [2010-07-05]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

Innovation [2010-05-25]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

  • Innovation and R&D [The Economist]
    The Economist provides two interactive visualisations that show the future of innovation taking shape. We can see a strong link between the number of international patents that a country is granted and the amount that it spends on research and development. A 2007 snapshot shows this clearly, and also that America and Japan led the pack.
  • McLaren wins the innovation race [timkastelle.org]
    McLaren shows us how to leverage lessons learnt in Formula 1 in other domains, such as air traffic control and health care, making them the masters of extending current competencies into new fields.
  • The creative process gone wrong [Bob Sutton]
    It seems that the very tools we often use to manage the creative, innovation process can be the source of the process’s biggest problems.
  • What if the very theory that underlies why we need patents is wrong? [techdirt]
    Our current patent system was designed for an earlier, gentler age. A number of pundits are – quite rightly – pointing out that the system is tremendously obsolete in terms of actually promoting the progress, and is set up in a way that favors a concept of innovation and invention that may not be how the world actually works today.

Innovation [2010-05-10]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

Innovation [2010-04-26]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

Innovation [2010-02-17]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

  • An innovation report card [The Conference Board of Canada]
    Countries with the highest overall scores not only spend more on science and technology but also have policies that drive innovation supply and demand.
  • Innovation: what’s your score? [McKinsey & Company: What Matters]
    Can companies measure the impact of their innovation activities? Can they benchmark their performance on innovation against that of their peers? Can the long-term effects of innovation strategies be tracked systematically? Yes, yes, and yes. In fact, not only can companies objectively assess innovation; we believe they must. Only then will they know how to select the right strategies and execute them well.
  • The Original Futurama: The Legacy of the 1939 World’s Fair [Popular Mechanics]
    Seventy years after the closing of the 1939 New York World’s Fair, The Daily Show writer Elliott Kalan looks back at its past vision of the World of Tomorrow.
  • Why private companies are more innovative [BusinessWeek: NEXT]
    Do privately held companies have an edge when it comes to long-term innovation? At least some of them seem to. Recently, Al Gore—former Vice-President and Senator and now Nobel Prize-winning environmental evangelist—declared S.C. Johnson & Son one of the most sustainable companies in the world.

Innovation [2009-11-30]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

  • Patent Volume Isn’t the Best Innovation Gauge [BusinessWeek: Innovate]
    Patent volume isn’t necessarily a valid proxy for innovation. A study by the Patent Board, an intellectual-property consultancy, shows there are other—and better—ways to quantify innovation. Ranked by sheer volume, Honda Motor is No. 1, with 54. That’s almost twice second-place Panasonic, which has 28. Ranked by other metrics, though, Honda isn’t a leader.
  • The Downside of Seeking Common Ground [strategy+business]
    People’s tendency to find common ground in conversation by focusing on what’s familiar can stifle the most innovative thinkers.
  • Is America Losing Its Mojo? [Newsweek]
    Innovation is as American as baseball and apple pie. But some traditions can’t be trademarked.
  • Innovation relies on synthesis [Innovate on Purpose]
    We often talk about the importance of combining disparate skills or capabilities when innovating, or holding two diametrically opposing ideas and finding the happy medium. What should be obvious is that one of the most important skills from an innovation perspective is the act and insight of synthesis.

Innovation [2009-10-05]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

This issue:

Innovation [2009-09-21]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

This issue:

Innovation [2009-08-10]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

This issue: