Tag Archives: Tim Kastelle

Innovation [2010-05-25]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

  • Innovation and R&D [The Economist]
    The Economist provides two interactive visualisations that show the future of innovation taking shape. We can see a strong link between the number of international patents that a country is granted and the amount that it spends on research and development. A 2007 snapshot shows this clearly, and also that America and Japan led the pack.
  • McLaren wins the innovation race [timkastelle.org]
    McLaren shows us how to leverage lessons learnt in Formula 1 in other domains, such as air traffic control and health care, making them the masters of extending current competencies into new fields.
  • The creative process gone wrong [Bob Sutton]
    It seems that the very tools we often use to manage the creative, innovation process can be the source of the process’s biggest problems.
  • What if the very theory that underlies why we need patents is wrong? [techdirt]
    Our current patent system was designed for an earlier, gentler age. A number of pundits are – quite rightly – pointing out that the system is tremendously obsolete in terms of actually promoting the progress, and is set up in a way that favors a concept of innovation and invention that may not be how the world actually works today.

Information overload

We’re drowning in information, as I’ve written about before, both in the context of Business Intelligence and Innovation (whatever that is). An interesting blog post by Tim Kastelle over at his Innovation Leadership Network takes the somewhat contrarian view, that we have always had this information overload problem. Quoting Stowe Boyd, he points out:

I suggest we just haven’t experimented enough with ways to render information in more usable ways, and once we start to do so, it will like take 10 years (the 10,000 hour rule again) before anyone demonstrates real mastery of the techniques involved.

The problem is that our current tooling for information processing is not up to the task at hand. Unfortunately Tim, like most of us, is still trying to find the best way to managed the information load pressing down on us.

Any suggestions?

Posted via email from PEG @ Posterous