Tag Archives: Seven Sources of Innovation

Vacuum flasks: fulfilling a need

As seen on a plaque at Scienceworks in the House Secrets exhibit.

James Dewar invented the vacuum flask in 1892 to keep laboratory gases cold. Twelve years later, Reinhold Burger manufactured the Thermos to keep our picnic drinks hot.

A nice demonstration of the third of Peter Drucker’s seven sources of innovation.

Innovation based on process need.

Or, put another way, James Dewar scratched an itch; though he did play Edison to Reinhold Burger’s Sameul Insull.

Posted via web from PEG @ Posterous

Innovation linkage

I gave a talk on innovation at Chisholm tonight in their Business Innovation Seminar Series, and promised to provide links to some of my references. Here they are:

Leave a comment if I’ve missed anything and I’ll try and find a reference.

Tea bags: the unexpected

As seen on a plaque at Scienceworks in the House Secrets exhibit.

A thrifty tea merchant from New York named Thomas Sullivan is credited with inventing the first tea bag in 1908. Looking to save money, Sullivan reportedly distributed small samples of tea in silk bags instead of little metal tins. It wasn’t until after he saw restaurant and coffee shop owners brewing the entire bag of tea leaves that he realized the potential of his actions.

A nice demonstration of the first, and most valuable, of Peter Drucker’s seven sources of innovation.

The unexpected. The unexpected success, failure or outside event.

Posted via web from PEG @ Posterous

Penicillin: the unexpected

As seen on a plaque at Scienceworks.

The penicillin mold was a pest, not a resource. Backteriologists went to great lengths to protect their bacterial cultures against contamination by it. Then in the 1920s, a London doctor, Alexander Fleming, realized that this “pest” was exactly the bacterial killer bacteriologists had been looking for – and the penicillin mold became a valuable resource.

A nice demonstration of the first, and most valuable, of Peter Drucker‘s seven sources of innovation.

The unexpected. The unexpected success, failure or outside event.

Posted via web from PEG @ Posterous

Innovation [2009-09-07]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

This issue: