Tag Archives: formula one

Some new rules for IT

The other week I had a go at capturing the rules of enterprise IT{{1}}. The starting point was a few of those beery discussions we all have after work, where we came to wonder how the game of enterprise IT was changing. It’s the common refrain of big-to-small, the Sieble to Saleforce.com transition which sees the need for IT services (internal or external) change dramatically. The rules of IT are definitely changing. Now that I’ve had a go at old rules, I thought I’d have a go at seeing what the new rules might be.

As I mentioned before, enterprise IT has historically been seen as an asset management function, a production line for delivering large IT assets into the IT estate and then maintaining them. The rules are the therefore rules of business operations. My attempt at capturing 4 ± 2 rules (with friends) produced the following (in no particular order):

[[1]]The rules of Enterprise IT @ PEG[[1]]

  • Keep the lights on. Much like being a trucker, the trick is to keep the truck rolling (and avoid spending money on tyres). Otherwise known as smooth running applications are the ticket to the strategy table.
  • Save money. Business IT was born as a cost saving exercise (out with the rooms full of people, in with the punch card machines), and most IT business cases are little different.
  • Build what you need. I wouldn’t be surprised if the team building LEO{{2}} blew their own valve tubes. You couldn’t buy parts of the shelf so you had to make everything. This is still with us in some organisations’ strong desire to build – or at least heavily customise – solutions.
  • Keep the outside outside. We trust whatever’s inside our four walls, while deploying security measures to keep the evil outside. This creates an us (employees) and them (customers, partners, and everyone else) mentality.

[[2]]LEO: Lyons Electronic Office. The first business computer. @ Wikipedia[[2]]

Things have changed since these rules were first laid down. From another post of mine on a similar topic{{3}} (somewhat trimmed and edited):

[[3]]The IT department we have today is not the IT department we’ll need tomorrow @ PEG[[3]]

The recent global financial criss has fundamentally changed the business landscape, with many are even talking about the emergence of a new normal{{4}}. We’ve also seen the emergence of outsource, offshore, cloud computing, SaaS, Enterprise 2.0 and so much more.

Companies are becoming more focused, while leaning more heavily on partners and services companies (BPO, out-sourcers, consultants, and so on) to cover those areas of the business they don’t want to focus on. We can see this from the global companies who have effectively moved to a franchise model, though to the small end of town where startups are using on-line services such as Amazon S3, rather than building their own internal capabilities.

We’re also seeing more rapid business change: what used to take years now takes months, or even weeks. The constant value-chain optimisation we’ve been working on since the 70s has finally cumulated in product and regulatory life-cycles that change faster than we can keep up.

Money is also becoming (or has become) more expensive, causing companies and deals to operate with less leverage. This means that there is less capital available for major projects, pushing companies to favour renting over buying, as well as creating a preference for smaller, incremental change over the major business transformation of the past.

And finally, companies are starting to take a truly global outlook and operate as one cohesive business across the globe, rather than as a family of cloned business who operate more-or-less independently in each region.

[[4]]The new normal @ McKinsey Quarterly[[4]]

So what are the new 4 ± 2 rules? They’re not the old rules of asset management. We could argue that they’re the rules of modern manoeuvre warfare{{5}} (which would allow me to sneak in one of my regular John Boyd references{{6}}), but that would be have the tail wagging the dog as it’s business, and not IT that has that responsibility.

[[5]]Maneuver warfare @ Wikipedia[[5]]
[[6]]John Boyd @ Wikipedia[[6]]

I think that the new rules cast IT as something like that of a pit crew. IT doesn’t make the parts (though we might lash together something when in a pinch), nor do we steer the car. Our job is to swap the tyres, pump the fuel, and straighten the fender, all in that sliver of time available to us, so that the driver can focus on their race strategy and get back out on track as quickly as possible.

With that in mind, the following seems to be a fair (4 ± 2) minimum set to start with.

  • Timeliness. A late solution is often worse than no solution at all, as you’ve spent the money without realising any benefit. Or, as a wise sage once told me, management is the art of making a timely decision, and then making it work. Where before we could take the time to get it right (after all, the solution will be in the field for a long time and needs to support a lot of people, so better to discover problems early rather than later), now we just need to make sure the solution is good enough in the time available, and has the potential to grow to meet future demand. The large “productionisation” efforts of the past need to be broken into a series of incremental improvements (à la Gmail and the land of perpeputal beta), aligning investment with both opportunity and realised value.
  • Availability. Not just up time, but ensuring that all stakeholders (both in and outside the company, including partners and clients) can get access to the solutions and data they need. There’s little value in a sophisticated knowledge base solution if the sales team can’t use it in the field to answer customer questions in real time. Once they’ve had to fire up the laptop, and the 3G card, and the VPN, the moment has passed and the sale lost. Or worse, forcing them to head back to the bricks and mortar office. As I pointed out the other week, decisions are more important than data{{7}}, and success in this environment means empowering stakeholders to make the best possible decisions by ensuring that the have the data and functions they need, where they need, when they need it, and in a format that make it easy to consume.
  • Agility. Agility means creating an IT estate that meet the challenges we can see coming down the road. It doesn’t mean creating an infinitely flexible IT estate. Every bit of flexibility we create, every flex point we add, comes at a cost. Too much flexibility is a bad thing{{8}}, as it weighs us down. Think of formula one cars: they’re fast and they’re agile (which is why driving them tends to be a young mans game), and they’re very stiff. Agility comes from keeping the weight down and being prepared to act quickly. This means keeping things simple, ensuring that we have minimum set of moving parts required. The F1 crowd might have an eye for detail, such as putting nitrogen{{9}} in the tyres, but unnecessary moving parts that might reduce reliability or performance are eliminated. Agility is the cross product of weight, speed, reliability and flexibility, and we need to work to get them all into balance.
  • Sustainability. Business is not a sprint (ideally), and this means that cost and reliability remain important factors, but not the only factors. While timeliness, availability and agility might be what drive us forward, we need still need to ensure that IT is still a smooth running operation. The old rules saw cost and reliability as absolutes, and we strived to keep costs as low, and reliability as high, as possible. The new rules see us balancing sustainability with need, accepting (slightly) higher costs or lower reliability to provide a more timely, available or agile solution while still meeting business requirements. (I wonder if I should have called this one “balance”.)

[[7]]Decisions are more important than data @ PEG[[7]]
[[8]]Having too much SOA is a bad thing (and what we might do about it) @ PEG[[8]]
[[9]]Understanding the sport: Tyres @ formula1.com[[9]]

While by no mean complete or definitive, I think that’s a fair set of rules to start the discussion.

Having too much SOA is a bad thing (and what we might do about it)

SOA enablement projects (like a lot of IT projects) have a bad name. An initiative that starts as a good idea to create a bit more flexibility in the IT estate often seems to end up mired in its own complexity. The problem is usually too much flexibility, as flexibility creates complexity, and complexity exponentially increases the effort required to manage and deliver the software. Without any solid guidance on how much flexibility to create (and where to create it) most SOA initiatives simply keep creating flexibility until either the project collapses under its own weight, or the projected development work to create all the services exceeds the available CAPEX budget. A little flexility is good, but too much is bad. How can we scope the flexibility, pointing it where it’s most needed while preventing it from becoming a burden?

The challenge with SOA enablement is in determining how much flexibility to build into the IT estate. Some flexibility is good – especially if it’s focused on where the business needs it the most – but too much flexibility is simply another unnecessary cost. The last decade or so is littered with stories of companies who’s SOA initiatives were either brought to an early close or canned as they had consumed all the cash the business was prepared to invest into a major infrastructure project. Finance and telecoms seem particularly prone of creating these gold-plated SOA initiatives. (How many shelf-ware SDFs – service delivery frameworks – do you know of?)

The problem seems to be a lack of guidance on how much flexibility to build, or where to put it. We sold the business on the idea that a flexible, service-oriented IT estate would be better then the evil monolithic applications of old, but the details of just how flexible the new estate would be were a little fuzzy. Surely these details can be sorted out in service discovery? And governance should keep service discovery on track! We set ourselves up by over-promising and under-delivering.

Mario Batali: Too much is never enough!
Mario Batali

This much was clear: the business wanted agility, and agility requires flexibility. As flexibility comes from having more moving parts (services), we figured that creating more moving parts will create more agility. Service discovery rapidly became a process of identifying every bit of (reusable) functionality that we can pack into a service. More is better, or, as the man with the loud shoes says:

Too much is never enough!
Mario Batali

The problem with this approach is that it confuses flexibility and agility. It’s possible to be very flexible without being agile, and vica versa. Think of a formula one car: they’re fast and they’re agile (which is why driving them tends to be a young mans game), and they’re very stiff. Agility comes from keeping the weight down and being prepared to act quickly. This means keeping things simple, ensuring that we have minimum set of moving parts required. They might have an eye for detail, such as nitrogen in the tyres, but unnecessary moving parts that might reduce reliability or performance are eliminated.

This gold plated approach to SOA creates a lot of unrequired flexibility, this additional flexibility increases complexity, and the complexity becomes the boat anchor that slows you down and stops you from being agile. Turning the car is no longer a simple of tugging on the steering wheel, as we need governance to stop us from pulling the wrong lever in the bank of 500 identical levers in front of us.

It's really that simple!
It's really that simple!

We’ve made everything too complicated. Mario was wrong: too much is too much.

What we need is some guidance – a way of scoping and directing the flexibility we’re going to create. Governance isn’t enough, as governance is focused on stopping bad things from happening. We have a scoping problem. Our challenge is to understand what flexibility will be required in the future, and agreeing on the best way to support it.

To date I’ve been using a very fuzzy “business interest” metric for this, where services are decomposed until the business is no longer interested. The rational is that we put the flexibility only were the business thinks it needs to focus. This approach works fairly well, but it relies too much on the tacit judgement of a few skilled business analysts and architects, making it too opaque and hard to understand for the people not involved in the decision making process. It’s also hard to scale. We need something more deterministic and repeatable.

Which brings me to a friend’s MBA thesis, which he passed to me the other week. It’s an interesting approach to building business cases for IT solutions, one based on real options.

The problem with the usual approaches to building a business case, using tools like net present value (NPV) and discounted cash flow, is that we assume that the world doesn’t change post the decision to build the solution (or not). They don’t factor in the need to change a solution once it’s in the field, or even during development.

The world doesn’t work this way: the solution you approved in yesterday’s business environment will be deployed into a radically different business environment tomorrow. This makes it hard to justify the additional investment required for a more flexible SOA based solution, when compared to a conventional monolithic solution. The business case doesn’t include flexibility as a factor, so more flexible (and therefore complex and expensive) solutions lose to the cheaper, monolithic approach.

Real options address this by pushing you down a scenario planning based approach. You estimate the future events that you want to guard against, and their probabilities, creating a set of possible futures. Each event presents you with options to take action. The action, for example, might be to change, update or replace components in the solution to bring them in line with evolving business realities. The options are – in effect – flex-points that we might design into our solutions SOA. The real options methodology enables us to ascribe costs to these future events and the create a decision tree that captures the benefits of investing in specific flex points, all in a clear and easily understandable chain of reasoning.

The decision tree and options provide us with a way to map out where to place flex points in the SOA solution. They also provide us with strong guidance on how much flexibility to introduce. And this is the part I found really interesting about the approach. It also provides us with a nice framework to govern the evolution of the SOA solution, as changes are (generally) only made when an option is taken: when it’s business case is triggered.

It’s a bit like those formula one cars. A friend of mine used to work for one F1 manufacturer designing and testing camshafts. These camshafts had to fall within a 100,000 lifetime revolution window. An over-designed camshaft was unnecessary weight, while an under-designed one means that you wouldn’t win (or possibly even finish) the race. Work it out: a 100,000 revolutions is a tiny window for an F1 car, given the length of a race.

An approach like real options helps us ensure that we only have the flexibility required in the solution, and that it is exactly where it is required. Not too much, and not too little. Just enough to help us win the race.