Tag Archives: Centre for Screen Business

Innovation [2009-11-16]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

  • Warren Buffett’s bet against innovation [BusinessWeek: Innovate]
    In proclaiming an “all-in wager on the economic future of the United States, Warren Buffett just paid $44 billion for a 19th century technology platform, a railroad, that carries 20th century goods—coal, agriculture, imports from Asia, petroleum. This is a vision of an America mired in the past and in economic and political decline. And Buffett just might be right. He has a great track record betting against innovation.
  • Embracing Innovation: a new methodology for feature film production in Australia [Centre for Screen Business]
    Do too many Australian films fall into a budgetary ‘no-man’s land’ – not big enough to compete with the US studios, yet too big to stand a chance of commercial viability in a market flooded with independent films? Robert Connolly’s recommendations provide us with valuable grist for the mill as we, in the IT industry, work our way through the current evolutionary phase our industry is going through, driven by the shift from large, on premises applications to a future increasingly dominated by cloud solutions. His approach to the problem is also an excellent model of how to engage with the wholesale transformation of an industry.
  • 10 examples of minimum viable products [Venture Hacks]
    Brilliant products are rarely the result of brilliant ideas. Most products start small, as minimum viable products, and then grow as the customers and developers work together to learn what the product should be.
  • What do the crowds know about innovation? [Innovate on Purpose]
    Companies use different strategies and techniques for crowdsourcing ideas. All of these approaches help gather ideas from the crowd, but they also serve as trend spotting and public relations opportunities as well, and some companies might be more interested in these secondary effects. As Henry Ford pointed out, “If I had asked my customers what they wanted, they would have said a faster horse.”

What Australia does well

Australia is a long way from anywhere, making it hard (historically) to lean on overseas skills to solve problems. This has breed a strong streak of pragmatism into the Australian DNA pool, leading us to find pragmatic solutions to real problems.

Embracing Innovation: a new methodology for feature film production in Australia
Embracing Innovation: a new methodology for feature film production in Australia

Robert Connolly published a brilliant white paper in February 2008 which is a great example of this in action. Showing a a strong sense of realism and common sense, Robert pulls apart the Australian film industry and, using clear and direct language, provides a set of good recommendations on how we might address the challenges the Australian film industry faces.

There’s a lot of good ideas in the paper for the IT services industry. To a certain extent we’re caught in a similar situation, caught between the low budget films of SaaS (software-as-a-service), and spiralling demands from our star talent (architects, project managers, …) who’s careers drive them toward block buster projects. The top four measures he proposes might even provide us with a template to create a new engagement model that incentivises the IT industry to deliver business outcomes, rather than IT assets:

  • a first dollar share for filmmakers,
  • fair returns for cast and crew,
  • more realistic budget models, and
  • simplified reporting obligations.

Robert’s recommendations provide us with valuable grist for the mill as we, in the IT industry, work our way through the current evolutionary phase our industry is going through, driven by the shift from large, on premises applications to a future increasingly dominated by cloud solutions. His approach to the problem is also an excellent model of how to engage with the wholesale transformation of an industry.

Posted via email from PEG