Category Archives: old Innovation

Ahead of trends – the random effect

I’ll be speaking at InnoFuture Momentum on August 5th, 3:30pm to 6:30pm, in Telstra’s Executive Briefing Centre, Level 18, 35 Collins Street, Melbourne.

InnoFuture Momentum is a dedicated network for innovation professionals to Connect, Attract and Adapt.

The topic for the event is Ahead of trends — the random effect.

When a concept becomes a trend, you are a not the leader. How to tap into valuable ideas for products, services and communication before they are seen as trends, when they are just … random? Albert Einstein said that imagination is more important than knowledge. Let’s open the doors and let the imagination in for it seems that in the current crisis, the right brain is winning and we may be rationalized to death before things get better.

I’ll be speaking about Of snow mobiles and childhood readers: why random isn’t, and how to make it work for you.

There’s an interesting roster of speakers:

  • MC & Host: Leonie Valentine, GM, Customer Experience Marketing, Telstra Industry Panel: Diverse industry perspectives will be presented to provide a balanced insight into this important thought leadership topic.
  • Drew Ginn, OAM, ‘Oarsome Foursome’ : The future is now: what are the random moments for professional high performance.
  • Elizabeth Rudd, FutureNous: Picking up weak signals – why are they valuable in making future decisions and how to tune in.
  • Charlie Nelson, Foresee Change: random numbers… yes, but there is no such thing as ‘random’… the patterns associated with the wisdom of crowds … and how you can the wisdom of crowds work for you
  • Peter Evans-Greenwood: Of snow mobiles and childhood readers: why random isn’t, and how to make it work for you.
  • Discussion Moderator: Amantha Imber, Inventium: Latest Australian Author of a business bestseller ‘The Creativity Formula’ (soon to be released).

The event wraps up with an interactive discussion and networking. Walk away with inspiration & ideas to implement. Meet other corporate innovators and innovation evangelists. Share ideas over a drink! Experience the stimulating environment of the high-tech Telstra Executive Briefing Centre.

Hope to see you there!

Innovation [2009-07-13]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

This issue:

  • Neuromancer turns 25: What it got right, what it got wrong [Macworld]
    It’s been 25 years since William Gibson’s groundbreaking book. 25 years is an extremely long time in the technology world. What did he get right? And what did he get wrong?
  • 10 Products and Innovations from Recessions Past [Bill Shrink]
    We all associate recessions with negative things. Unemployment, slowdowns, and lost profits dominate the headlines and color most every recession-themed discussion. But this is only part of the story. Desperation breeds creativity, as many know. And as a testament to this timeless axiom, a number of the world’s foremost innovations came about during recessionary times. From increased convenience and food products, to formidable technological advances, the following represent some of the most noteworthy recession-borne innovations.
  • Six Myths of Innovation [CIO insight]
    Innovation has us often questioning our assumptions. Why not questions our assumptions about innovation?
  • How Nintendo Delights Its Customers [Peter Merholz]
    How did Nintendo come from a long way behind Microsoft and Sony, and end up dominating the industry?

Innovation [2009-06-29]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

This issue:

Innovation [2009-06-15]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

This issue:

  • Powering Ideas [Review of Australia’s Innovation System]
    Australia’s innovation agenda for the 21st century. Well worth the read
  • Who Drives Software Innovation? The “Best-of-Breed vs. Giants” Debate [SmartData Collective]
    Is it the industry giants or the smaller, and more agile, best-of-breed players that drive innovation in our industry?
  • The Future of the Workplace [Monocle]
    In the first edition of Monocle’s Design Dialogues, an intimate series of discussions on key design issues, they throw the spotlight on the future of the workplace.
  • How Twitter will change the way we live [Time]
    Are tools like Twitter changing the dynamics of innovation? Traditionally we have used metrics to measure innovation which capture the inputs to the productization process; numbers like volume of patents generated or size of R&D spend. As Steven Johnson says toward the end of this article, “if you measure global innovation in terms of actual lifestyle-changing hit products and not just grad students, the U.S. has been lapping the field for the past 20 years”. What should we measure (as what’s measure is what gets done) if we want to innovate like Twitter?

Innovation [2009-06-01]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

This issue:

  • The Disruption Talk [A VC]
    Fred Wilson (a VC in New York) partly crowd-sourced a presentation on disruption, presented at Google, recorded and stashed on YouTube.
  • In-N-Out Burger’s six secrets for out-and-out success [Daily Finance]
    On the heels of mounting cynicism generated by Wall Street bailouts and the perception that corporate leaders are gaming the system to make a profit, at least one American company is proving that businesses can survive and even thrive while sticking to traditional values.
  • Farmers Didn’t Invent Tractors. They Were Busy Farming. [Ben Casnocha]
    There’s a cliche in innovation / entrepreneurship which says, “Scratch your own itch.” That is, solve problems that you know really well. This is not always so.
  • Obama’s Seven Lessons for Radical Innovators [Harvard Business]
    Barak Obama’s presidential bid succeeded was a research lab for using social media in a political campaign. It differs from yesterday’s political organizations as much as Google and Threadless differ from yesterday’s corporations: all are a tiny handful of truly new, 21st century institutions in the world today. Here are the seven rules his campaign lived by.

Innovation [2009-05-18]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

This issue:

Innovation [2009-05-04]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

This issue:

Innovation [2009-04-20]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around
the Internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

This issue:

  • Inside Google’s design process [BusinessWeek: Innovation]
    Google takes an integrated approach to innovation, pulling together design, analysis and engineering to create an iterative processes which helps them nurture small ideas into big products.
  • Horizontal Innovation Networks: By and for Users [Eric von Hippel]
    Innovation development, production, distribution and consumption networks can be built up horizontally—with actors consisting only of innovation users (more precisely, “user/self-manufacturers”). Some open source software projects are examples of such networks, and examples can be found in the case of physical products as well. In this article, we discuss three conditions under which user innovation networks can function entirely independently of manufacturers. We then explore related empirical evidence, and conclude that conditions favorable to horizontal user innovation networks are often present in the economy.
  • Jim Jarmusch On Stealing From Everywhere [PSFK]
    Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination…
  • If Isaac Asimov designed your computer… [Educated Guesswork]
    Like nearly all science fiction authors of that era, Asimov got computers pretty much all wrong, in at least three major ways.

Innovation [2009-03-27]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the Internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

This issue:

Innovation [2009-03-09]

Another week and another collection of interesting ideas from around the Internet.

As always, thoughts and/or comments are greatly appreciated.

This issue: