Monthly Archives: December 2012

We are all expectation machines

Christmas presents

Unlearning is potentially more important than learning{{1}} as it allows us to sweep away concepts and preferences that are now longer relevant, clearing the way for us to learn something new which doesn’t sit well with what we previously knew. But why is unlearning so hard? It’s because we’re trained from birth to favour ideas and experiences that align with our expectations, and abhor those that clash with them. The real challenge is to manage our expectations, as we’re all expectation machines.

[[1]]Unlearning is the most important thing @ PEG[[1]]

Continue reading We are all expectation machines

Unlearning is the most important thing

After class

We’ve all become obsessed with learning over the last few years. The world is changing quite rapidly and we need to constantly learn new tricks if we want to keep up with the market we work in. Learning the new-new thing is often seen as the key to success. This attitude has it all backwards; it’s not learning that is the challenge, it’s our ability to unlearn that’s holding many of us back.

Continue reading Unlearning is the most important thing

Governance isn’t a process

For some strange reason every time someone mentions ‘governance’ all sense is thrown out the window, the process wonks rub their hands with glee, and you soon find yourself waist deep in treacle like processes that slow everything down to the point that it’s impossible to get anything done.

Governance isn’t a process, and adding more processes won’t necessarily improve your governance.

Governance is a question of decision rights:

  • who gets to make the decision
  • what information should be considered when making the decision
  • who can influence the decision
  • who needs to be informed of the decision

‘Process’ is just a tool we use to manage the decision making journey.